The Gates Foundation was not kicked out of India over HPV vaccine project

by Rahul Devi

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has been a subject of controversy and misinformation related to their work in India. A Facebook post claims that thousands of Indian girls were injured or disabled by the HPV vaccine in 2009, leading to the Gates Foundation being kicked out of India. However, this claim is not correct.

The Gates Foundation is still actively working in India, and there is no evidence to support the claim that thousands of girls involved in an HPV vaccination project were left injured or disabled. In fact, a committee set up by the Indian Government found that the deaths of seven girls who were given HPV vaccines were most likely unrelated to the vaccine. The committee did acknowledge that reporting on adverse events after immunization was inadequate, but it did not find evidence of widespread injuries or disabilities.

The vaccines used in the project had been approved for use in India, and the US Food and Drug Administration conducted safety studies involving tens of thousands of women. Therefore, there is no basis for the claim that the HPV vaccine caused harm on a large scale.

It is important to address health misinformation on vaccines because it can have direct consequences on people’s physical and psychological health. Additionally, it can create distrust in medical professionals and undermine public health messaging. Spreading misinformation about vaccines puts communities at risk and can have serious implications for public health.

The claims about the Gates Foundation being kicked out of India also lack validity. While there were news reports in 2017 that the Indian government would partially fund an immunization program in New Delhi previously funded by the Gates Foundation, the foundation’s work in India continues. They have an office in India and collaborate with various stakeholders, including the central and state governments, non-profits, academic institutions, and development organizations.

It is crucial to prioritize honesty in public debate, especially when it comes to matters of public health. Misinformation can have far-reaching consequences, and it is essential to rely on accurate and evidence-based information to make informed decisions.

In conclusion, the claim that thousands of Indian girls were injured or disabled by the HPV vaccine in 2009, leading to the Gates Foundation being kicked out of India, is not supported by evidence. The Gates Foundation is still working in India, and there is no substantiated proof of widespread harm caused by the vaccine. It is crucial to combat health misinformation and prioritize accurate information in order to protect public health.

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